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PostPosted: April 12th, 2017, 2:11 pm 
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Joined: July 8th, 2011, 7:02 am
Posts: 1007
Location: Mackay, Queensland, Australia
In September 2016 I decided to attend the Bikeme.tv forum 2017 event called the Tumbarumba TT.
In December my wife Gillian was given the option of eye surgery to correct double vision, and this was booked for mid-February with 2 weeks post-op in Brisbane in case of complications. The turn-around from arriving home from Brisbane, to leaving for Tumbarumba was so small that I decided to trailer the Transalp to Brisbane and leave it at my folks place.
We arrived back in Mackay on Saturday arvo (the op was a complete success) and I flew back to Brisbane (about 1000km by road) on the Monday arvo (afternoon).
In Australia we use the metric system and 1km (kilometre) equals 0.625mi, 1kg (kilogram) equals 2.205lb, and 1L (litre) equals 33.8 US fluid ounces (3.787L equals 1 US gallon.)

Day 1 Tuesday 7/3/17:
I awoke early, but as usual I was almost afraid to be on my way, the odo read 50,106km. About 7.45am (8.45 daylight time) I left my folks place and fueled up, before riding across the northwest suburbs and out over Mts Nebo and Glorious and it was fun to ride so many corners after all the straight roads around my home town.
Through Fernvale and skirting between Ipswich and Amberley Air Force Base I headed south to Boonah, where I refueled and studied the map for the turn off. Out along the Rathdowney Rd I turned right at Coochin Coochin and followed Carneys Creek Road through to the Killarney turn off, but instead of turning I stopped, checked the map and headed straight on along the White Swamp Rd, crossing into NSW at this point:

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This road varies between narrow black top and rutted gravel, though, as I found later in the trip, it may have been my first ride over it that made me think it was really rough. I nearly crashed about 35 times every kilometre, as I reacquainted myself with riding the old girl, loaded up, over unsealed roads. Eventually this road intersected the Mount Lindsay Rd at Koreelah between Woodenbong and Legume and I turned towards Legume, then onto the Tooloom Rd, which turned out to be a fun road in the Nymboida sense, narrow twisty sealed road with plenty of humps, bumps and potholes. This led me to the next road I’d been wanting to explore, the Paddys Flat Rd and I’d calculated it well enough that I caught up to a Land Cruiser ute (Aussie for pick up truck) that was holding me up a short distance before the turn off so I followed it for a minute or so to avoid overshooting the turn.
Turning onto the Paddys Flat Rd I soon reached gravel again and found myself having to recite over and over again “Not so tight on the bars, let it find its own way” and saying over and over again “Oooh phuq I nearly crashed again!” every time the front or rear rolled sideways over a pebble bigger than a marble.
Much to my surprise, and in a tight part of the road, I caught up to, and followed for a minute or so, a couple on his and hers BMW adventure bikes. Hers was a 650 single by the pipes I remember, his a bigger one, but I was so busy not crashing as I went around them that I took little notice of his bike (I think it was an 800 parallel twin, but don’t hold me to it).
This overtaking manoeuvre massaged my ego so much that for 2 or 3 minutes I felt like a dirt hero and the track seemed to improve and the near crashes to reduce. At the Paddys Flat Crossing of the Clarence River I stopped for the mandatory photo opportunity, and was surprised that Mr and Mrs BMW didn’t catch up, I was a dirt bike hero!

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Off I rode on alternating gravel and narrow sealed road until I was deposited on the Bruxner Hwy within 100m of the Plains Station Rd, so I stopped beside it and got out the map to make sure this road lead to the Clarence Way. As I was doffing my helmet a bloke on a Triumph XRT800 turned from the direction of Drake, waved, and headed at speed down this road I was unsure about. Two minutes or so later I departed in hot pursuit, confident that this was the road I wanted.
About 20km or so along, this road crosses the Clarence river at a causeway with sand across the road on the exit, which I invariably felt I was going to crash in, but I didn’t and kept going. Within 2 or 3 km I spied old mate on the XRT through some curves about half a km or so in front. He must have stopped thought I, as he’d left the Bruxner at speed and with confidence as I looked at the map earlier.
As I turned onto the Clarence Way, on a sealed section, old mate was not far in front, travelling light, a local I guessed, and standing on the pegs. I was saddle sore so I could understand this choice. The trouble was he was doing just under 100km/h (62.5mph) and when we crossed onto gravel a short distance ahead he slowed to about 70. In less than 500m I got sick of eating dust and went around him, remaining seated and accelerated to a speed I felt comfortable at, probably about 100km/h. This was another ego massaging moment and I was once more a dirt bike hero.
Not too far up the road I encountered what seemed like an easy left hand corner but soon found myself on the shoulder on the right (we drive on the left) side of the road, looking at the road and telling myself “it’ll go where you look so don’t look at the trees”. This slowed my progress for a minute or so while I adjusted to no longer being Toby Price. I expected to be overtaken by ol’ mate but it didn’t happen so I carried on and only “nearly crashed” about 3 or 4 times every km thereafter.
Some distance down the road, and before I reached Copmanhurst, I passed a sign that said Jackadgerry 19km. As the fuel was already on empty and Grafton was over 30km away I skidded to a halt, turned around and headed that way. At the Gwydir Hwy I turned left, then thought better of it, pulled over, checked the map, turned around and headed towards Glen Innes. As I was about to stop and recheck I crossed Jackadgerry Ck then the Mann River and there it was. 285km and the old girl took 18.5 litres, out of what I thought was 19.5L capacity.
A quick bite to eat and a drink and a text to Woodduck (a mate in Armidale) to say where I was and I headed for Glenn Innes and Armidale, with the Transalp running roughly at the higher altitudes especially around Guyra, arriving at Chateau Wood after a detour to pick up a couple of bottles of vino, at about 7pm NSW time.
As ever the food and company were great as was the beer. At Woody’s suggestion I changed my plans for Wednesday so that I’d make Big D’s place at Blackheath in daylight.

Day 2 Wednesday 8/3/17:

After breakfast I left Woody’s place (wearing his old winter gloves) and headed through Uralla to Walcha, expecting to make it on the fuel in the tank. The engine gave its final cough as I approached the 50km/h sign on the edge of Walcha (less than 285km), so I coasted down hill to the show grounds where I could get clear of the road and poured the 10L of fuel from the Jerry Can into the tank. About 1km further on I stopped at the servo (gas station) and it took 18.5L to fill both tank and Jerry Can. So much for 19.5L capacity.
It was quite cool after the 36degC at Mackay airport on Monday arvo and I considered going across the road to Vinnies for cheap track suits to wear as long undies, but they weren’t opening for 20min so I headed out on Thunderbolts and turned right onto Aberbaldie Rd. This is a mostly sealed road that leads through Niangala to the Nowendoc Rd where I turned right towards Ogunbil. This road is mostly sealed also with a very tight narrow twisty section down into a valley, upon which I met a medium sized truck with cattle float attached. Some distance up the road past Ogunbil I turned left onto the Woolomin Gap Rd which is unsealed, tight and twisty and again I felt I was going to crash every 200m or so:

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After 35 near death experiences I reached Woolomin and sealed road and breathed another sigh of relief.
Out along the Nundle Rd I passed through Bowling Alley Point, Nundle, Crawney, Timor, Gundy, Segenhoe on a variety of narrow or two lane sealed road and gravel road, the most interesting of which was the Crawney Rd which is also narrow, twisty gravel road and to make it more interesting there were a grader, a vibrating roller and a water tanker working on the (for me) steepest twistiest part. Eventually the road deposited me in Scone where I retired to the Shrine of the Clown (Macdonalds) to plan the afternoon’s ride to Blackheath.
With my new found gravel prowess I was determined to find dirt to conquer while heading over to the Bylong Valley Way. Bike fuelled and belly full I departed Scone along Liverpool St and I managed to take the correct turn at Nandowra Rd. Some distance up the road I spotted Halls Rd and turned right looking for dirt which I soon found, but I was a bit put out on reaching a gateway that said Private Road and decided it was time to turn around when I realized the road stopped in a yard surrounded by a house and sheds. I may at this point have had to unpack the bike to get it off the ground due to my legs being too short.
Under way again I found my way to Castlerock Rd, the one I thought Halls Rd intersected, but alas it becomes The Bicentennial Trail and that intersects Castlerock Rd. Somehow I found my way to Sandy Hollow and doglegged my way onto the Bylong Valley Way which I am at least familiar with, and it was a most enjoyable ride through to Ilford. Sometime later and with daylight to spare I arrived at Big D’s place at Blackheath, where it was at least 20degC cooler than Mackay and moist.
As with my previous visit, the company was great, as was the food and David and Nola, whom Don stays with there, had turned on the electric blanket so that the northerner wouldn’t freeze. I slept very soundly and warmly thank-you.

Day 3 Thursday 9/3/17:

Big D and I loaded the bikes and headed for his place at Lyndhurst, via Oberon and Bathurst. Between Hampton and Oberon while I was enjoying the Twisties I thought Don was catching me, then realised it was two bikes and neither was a black XJR1300. I played with them for a while, then moved to the left and let a Ducati Hypermotard and an Aprilia (I think) by, which I then chased, managing to keep them in sight through to Oberon, then pulled over. Big D and I then made our way to Bathurst for brunch and I bought some warm clothes J.I.C.
We had ridden about 2 or 3 blocks from our brunch stop when Don’s bike stopped. It started again soon and we got out of town before it stopped again, right next to a very niffy road kill. Don rolled down the road a bit to get away from the stink and when he mentioned that the mechanic said “vacuum” I turned his fuel tap to “Pri”. It restarted and proceeded as far as a spot called “Dreamland” where it stopped once more. Having had time to think on the matter and having determined that it wasn’t a lack of suction to open the tap I remembered reading / hearing about a fuel cap with a blocked breather, and being a train driver I told Don we should dismantle the fuel cap.
This we did, about 27 times there on the side of the road with the loss of only one tiny spring, whose job it was to push the caps pivot pin, we eventually became experts at the process and lubricated the sprung bit with spit to finally get it to close again properly. At about this point I noticed a concertina gromit in the cap recess of said tank that lined up perfectly with the air bleed “line” in the gasket on the fuel cap. It was a light bulb moment. I said something like “Don, it’s the breather hose not the cap.” At which point Don started picking up drain hoses, wiping and then blowing through them. On the third try he hit pay dirt, initially going red in the face before we heard a high pitched whistle coming from the breather gromit. I then lifted the fuel tank and a gush of air came out and Don’s cheeks deflated. We redirected that hose to avoid kinking it and the mighty XJR ran like a dream from then on.
The rest of the ride to Lyndhurst was uneventful by comparison and we settled into Don’s place, after which he gave me the Cooks Tour of Lyndhurst in his 1947 Ford Prefect. Due to our not bringing towels we were unable to hitch a ride on any passing spaceships. A few beers and a meal at the pub and it was bed time.

Day 4 Friday 10/3/17:
Having sprayed chains and refuelled Thursday arvo we loaded up and headed to the Shrine of the Clown at Cowra to break our fast on toasties (toasted ham cheese and tomato sandwiches) and coffee. After Brekky it was a leisurely ride via Young, Wallendbeen, Old Gundagai Rd to Muttama, Burra Rd to Gundagai, then the Gocup Rd to Tumut where we refuelled. Somewhere along the way we passed this sculpture:

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From Tumut it was another leisurely ride through Batlow to Tumbarumba where we were among the early arrivals so we headed to the shop for beers and snacks.
We’d drank a few Boags each by the time Mikec turned up and advised us that the Hop Sauce (Mikec, a member of Bikeme forum with whom I've ridden a number of times, lives in Sydney NSW, and has recently set up his own brewing company, aimed squarely at the hipster market, i.e. craft beer that tastes great and costs a lot, AU$110 to AU$130 for a pack of 24 compared to AU$40 to $50 for high volume, we got a discount of about $25 a pack) was in fridges in the communal kitchen next door to the amenities. We found and claimed mine, as Don’s was in a locked frig and out of reach. As I cut the tape on the carton to open it I nicked one can so my first taste was of slightly chilled Hop Sauce, drank through a split in the middle of the can. It was quite tasty if a bit warm for my liking, so we put some in Don’s cabin frig and the rest on ice. At some point I was offered very taste looking brownies (the special kind), which for reasons of job security I had to refuse.
At some point I found myself looking at JDs very nice 1100 Kwaka, with Boris and Res, going by a pic posted elsewhere on the bikeme forum.

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(After our return to Lyndhurst, Big D asked me if the cops had been by, to which I replied something like “Not that I recall.” I was then shown the pic of the hoodlum catcher car with Boris, Res and myself standing on the driver’s side of it. At that point I started to remember some sketchy details of the conversation that went with the pic, not that I remember contributing much to it. By that time I hadn’t consumed much beer, but by the time I crashed out I was slightly abbreviated and so was my memory of the evening when I awoke, feeling well rested on Saturday morning.) I do remember introducing myself to most of the people who were there on Friday evening, whereas on Saturday there were many people who said “G’day Jack” to me but only a small number whose names I could remember. Sorry folks.
Pizzas were cooked for us on Friday night and while I remember eating one slice that somebody offered me, by the time I found out they were being cooked for us, they’d stopped cooking. Bugger! I had a great evening, heard many stories from many people and no doubt bent more than one ear with my own stories. It was a great night and I don’t know what I had intended to say next as it is now days/weeks later and I’ve drank most of a bottle of red. I remember going to bed and I seem to remember The False Boris (as opposed to Boris on the left in the shot above) going to bed, but as he tells it I was comatose when he went to bed and while he thought of giving me a nudge, no homo he reckoned, to check that I was still alive, he was a bit concerned that he might have to call the authorities to report my demise.

Day 5 Saturday 11/03/17:

Brekky was very nice and included bacon and egg rolls, and all sorts of healthy stuff, and I even saw Red Mohawk eating fruit salad and yoghurt, and realised that was available too. Realizing that I was on a hiding to nothing to be able to keep up to any of the road bikes there, I had already planned a ride to Wee Jasper and back. I have heard it mentioned many times and as it was just 135km or so away I decided this was the perfect opportunity to see it. With that in mind I loaded the soft panniers containing spare tubes and tyre changing gear and it worked, I didn’t get any flats on the whole trip, never mind this minor side show. Before setting off I noticed that Zart, the keeper of our cabin, was having trouble with a radiator leak from his ZRX1200 and offered to help, but he had it in hand and I was getting in the way so I left him to it.
I’m not sure what time I left Tumba, but I most certainly didn’t set any land speed records. There was maybe 35 or 40 km of gravel on the whole journey, but all I remembered was rough gravel road and nearly crashing many times. There is a particularly narrow section of road over the mountains and I met quite a few tin tops including some 4 wheel drives, on this section, and I found this a bit scary, but that is just me. I’ve come to realize that I have a wide yellow stripe of self-preservation running right down the middle of my back.
In time I reached Wee Jasper and found that it was closed, including the local store:

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I had a go at a selfie:

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After a few attempts at witty pics, and a check of the maps for the shortest way back to the Snowies, I hightailed it back the way I came and took the Billo Rd rather than the Wee Jasper Rd, thereby cutting out about 15km of dirt. At Tumut, I turned left and headed towards Cooma. Due to a diminishing supply of petrol, I pulled into Talbingo and refuelled, then headed around to the local shops for lunch. There was a very tidy 900SD sitting in the car park so I parked my very untidy Transalp right beside it, bought lunch and sat down opposite the owner of said Ducati. He’s a power engineer who travels the country and was familiar with the region around Mackay. We talked bikes and jobs and the usual shit that riders talk about when we meet on the road, and then we went our separate ways.
Some distance out of Talbingo, and with the good twisty bit long gone, where I’d overtaken 2 brothers on their Harley, and the Transalp struggling to breathe above the snow line, I was overtaken by 3 of our lot. I manage to keep them in sight until a short distance after we turned onto the link road. After that I realized that I was on a hiding to nothing in the keeping up stakes, so I settled into a more appropriate pace for the old girl.
I pulled over at the Tumut control station, where I took this shot:

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Then Phil pulled up and mentioned lack of grip, which I could empathize with, though not at the speeds and lean angles that Phil had issues with, and it was the conversation with Phil that made me realize that the Wee Jasper Rd was as much sealed as unsealed, thanks Phil.
Back under way I crossed the Hydro dams along the way:

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And eventually arrived at the Alpine Way where I turned north. Sometime later I passed a sign that said Tintaldra 9km. Having heard of it and intending to visit it one day I turned left and soon found myself on gravel, but easier going than the morning’s effort. Arriving at Tintaldra I parked in front of the now closed Tintaldra Pub (an icon for Aussie riders of a certain age), took the mandatory bike shots plus one each of the border signs:

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Set out from northern Queensland and made it into northern Victoria:

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And back into New South Wales

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Zart turned up and offered to buy me a beer at the Jingellic pub after I informed him that yes that was the shortest way to Tumbarumba, and that there was 9km of dirt along it. So off we headed to Walwa where I refuelled and we chatted with some other riders:

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From there we rode to Jingellic, Zart leading the way straight to the pub where we drank our beers, thanks Ron, took the mandatory pic:

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We made our way via Munderoo and Mannus back to Tumbarumba caravan park at which point Big D informed me that all our frozen water had melted. I turned around and went to the shop for a few more bags of ice, and on returning to the bike noticed a nail head in the rear tyre tread. The old girl wears tube type tyres so after consultation with Rob and his mate who were walking past, I removed the nail, and all was ok.
Back at the caravan park Don suggested we save the rest of our Hop Sauce and just drink the Boags we had bought. This seemed like a great idea so we did.
JD's Kawasaki 1100 was there:

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No wonder he's called the detailer.

The band set up, the attendees mingled and a very tasty BBQ dinner was served. As the Boags didn’t go down as smoothly as Mikec’s brew, I have a better memory of the proceedings, which is now getting sketchier by the day, 4 weeks having passed. Everybody seemed to have a great time, many stories were told of the day’s near death experiences and of motorcycling feats of daring do.

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Mandatory meal shot:

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Awards were handed out, music was played and enjoyed, I heard many more stories and bent more ears with mine before calling it a night. Apparently I slept through the burnout comp at around 3am, so I guess I had plenty of Boags on board after all.

Day 6 Sunday 12/03/17:

After another fine breakfast of bacon, eggs, snags etc, Big D and I packed our bikes, bade farewell to those still there and made our separate ways to Lyndhurst, Don via Holbrook, Wagga and Junee, while I rode with Partymore as far as the Wee Jasper Rd via the Billo Rd, as she’d asked about the road there and that was the way I’d planned to get to Yass. The narrow, windy gravel road over the mountains didn't seed quite so imposing this time:

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I got a pic of the school at Wee Jasper this time:

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We bade each other farewell in Wee Jasper where I’d been taking pics. From there I headed up to Yass where I lunched at the roadhouse and picked some likely gravel roads to take me through to Lyndhurst.
After lunch I took the Wargella Rd north, veering left onto the Laverstock Rd which ended in the driveway of somebody’s homestead, so I turned around and headed back to the Wargella Rd. There were some very large roos along this road, that were on the other side of the fence. I stopped to try to get a shot of one, but then this old homestead caught my eye so I got a pic of it instead. The pallets of bricks make me think it’s getting restored:

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Back on the right road I eventually passed through Rye Park, the road having changed back to black top perhaps 10km south of it:

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From there I took the Little Plains Rd as the signpost said Frogmore and I knew that was the general direction I wanted to go. It was a good, mostly smooth gravel road:

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A while later I reached a sealed road, and guessed this was the Rugby Rd and if If went another km or so north I’d reach Taylor’s Flat Rd, which I did. Through Taylor’s Flat and Reid’s Flat I came out on the Frogmore Rd south of Hovell’s Ck:

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This I followed to Darby’s Falls Rd where I turned right towards Wyangala to refuel. This is a piece of road that I have enjoyed riding 2 or 3 times before and after refuelling I headed over the hills and into Woodstock:

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It was a short trip to Don’s place at Lyndhurst where I was chauffeured in style in Big D’s ’47 Ford Prefect to the local café to get some tea:

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Insert Arthur Dent joke here (As we weren’t carrying towels we were unable to hitch a ride with any passing space craft)

It had been a big weekend so we didn’t stay up late, just 3 or 4 of Mikec’s beers and I was ready for sleep.

Day 7 Monday 13/03/17:

It turned cool during the night at Lyndhurst and by the time our bikes were packed we headed into a storm that had been brewing. It’s an eerie feeling to ride up a hill and have a massive lightning bolt strike so near you can smell it. “Am I the tallest thing on this bit of road?” went through my mind more than a few times. On arriving at Maccas in Bathurst for brekky Don said he’d seen, smelt and thought the same things. It was a simple decision to carry on up the highway to Blackheath, though as we approached Lithgow the road was closed by traffic controllers for road works so Don led the way onto a detour, via a section of the old highway and we didn’t have to sit in drizzling rain waiting.

On arriving in Lithgow Don led the way through the streets and onto another little gem of a road that bypassed some of the roadworks and dropped us between Hartley and Mt Victoria, after which we tackled the roadblocks that are the “not so” Great Western Hwy and arrived at Blackheath before lunch time. The rest of the day was spent in good company with good food and beer and I had a large warm bed once more to sleep in.

Day 8 Tuesday 14/03/17:
I left Blackheath in rain, and rode Bells Line of Road in rain and through the clouds. Until I reached Colo River on the Putty Road I was wiping the inside of my visor every minute or so to clear the fog. What a fun experience that was. I rode most of the Bucketts Way from Stroud Road in the dry, but because I wanted to be in Port Macquarie before dark, I had decided that Wingham to Wauchope in the clouds and rain over gravel in an hour was beyond my talents. After riding through rain along the Pacific Hwy from Taree, I arrived in downtown Port Macq at about 4.30.
Maps checked, bottloh location identified, I picked up a couple of bottles of wine and headed around to Skuzy’s place where I was welcomed with open arms by him and his family. Beers and wine were drank, dinner was cooked and eaten, stories were told and we headed for bed fairly early as it was a school night for my hosts.

Day 9 Wednesday 15/03/17:
I was up early, ate brekky with Skuzy and his dogs and started loading the bike as he left for work. After packing the bike I realised that my riding glasses were missing. I searched the room I’d slept in and every table etc I could remember going near, but to no avail. As I carry a spare set they were dug out and off I went, once again into the rain wiping fog from the inside of my visor, so I opted for the Oxley and the Nymboida roads instead of the Kempsey Ebor Rd, especially with memories of Vando and his bike having been rescued from it some years back. It was an enjoyable ride in the rain, I refuelled at Walcha and arrived in Armidale about 10, dropped Woody’s winter gloves at his place (nobody home, school day and all), had a feed at Maccas and decided it was time to replace the rear brake pads.
The local Honda dealer had a set in stock and I found my way there with only one wrong turn. After paying for them and digging out my tools I replaced the old pads (still had about enough material on each pad to coat a box of the old greenlight matches) and was on my way. After another wrong turn I was on the road to Grafton after midday and refuelled at Ebor to avoid running out before the next fuel. After a feed at Grafton I headed up the Summerland Way hoping to make the oldies place before dark. I did make Jimboomba before sunset but the ride across Brisbane at that time meant full dark when I reached their place.
A trip to the shop and I whipped up a cold meat and salad tea for mum and dad and me that was a big improvement on the frozen dinners they had planned. Another early night.

Day 10 Thursday 16/03/17:

I ventured in to Albion and got a new rear tyre fitted as the old one had only shadows of tread left and I knew it wouldn’t get me home to Mackay without exposing plies and possibly the tube too. Otherwise a quiet day with my folks.

Day 11 Friday 17/03/17:
St Patrick’s Day. Luckily, whilst away from home on my Honda, I had packed one green shirt:

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As the get together in Aldershot with some former Army Reserve mates wasn’t starting until later in the arvo, I loaded the bike and then hung around until 10am for the St Paddy’s day function at the oldies local café. After good coffee and snacks etc I headed out through Petrie and Dayboro to D’Aguilar and Woodford:

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From there I headed onto the Kilcoy – Beerwah Rd and turned onto a side road that promised to be “steep, winding and narrow”. And after wandering about on narrow winding black top eventually found my way to Maleny via the Bellthorpe Range Rd and some others, another hidden gem in the Nymboida style, only narrower:

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Maleny to Kenilworth via Witta and Kidman Ck, then Jones Hill outside Gympie via Brooloo and Kandanga, and as usual I took a wrong turn and found myself on Eel Ck Rd instead of Glastonbury Rd. Turn around, go back, and I arrived in Widgee where I refuelled, ate and drank and headed on to Woolooga, then through to rejoin the Bruce at Bauple. I’d intended to take the Brooweena Rd but decided to see what was on this road so ended up riding an extra 40km on the Bruce. Bugger!

At Jimmy’s place we have our own little club house with trophies from various exercises etc that the workshop members attended:

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and the racing plate lickers (greyhounds) we've owned:

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I got changed, borrowed a tintop, went into Maryborough and got beer and ice plus snacks for the evening’s festivities. Intending to behave myself as I had 700km or so to ride Saturday, I only bought one six pack and that was all the beer I drank. Jimmy’s Chilli spag bol went down a treat with all of us, as did the snacks we’d contributed. As the evening progressed, the port came out and we drank many of toasts, emptying 3 bottles between 8 of us, before I called it a night.

Day 12 Saturday 18/03/17:

I left Jimmy’s late in the morning after a hearty breakfast of bacon, eggs, snags etc, and made my bored way north along the Bruce to Rocky, with stops for fuel and food, reaching Rockhampton where Frog offered me a beer, stout if I remember correctly. I drank that and set off on the final leg of my Tumby TT adventure home to Mackay and arrived at about 7pm. The odo now reads 55,451, a journey of a bit over 5,300km (3300mi)
I had a grand time and will venture down there again.

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Born to be MILD
2003 Honda XL650V Transalp; 1977 Kawasaki Z750B twin;
2006 Hyosung GT250R; 2001 Yamaha FZS1000.


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PostPosted: April 13th, 2017, 9:37 am 
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Joined: March 16th, 2016, 8:29 am
Posts: 56
Location: London,UK
Great report Jackflash, what an adventure.....thoroughly enjoyed reading it and envied every mile you described!

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PostPosted: April 13th, 2017, 5:05 pm 
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Joined: February 9th, 2017, 5:15 pm
Posts: 8
Location: Australia ,Gold Coast
thoroughly enjoyed your adventure been on some of those roads and the ones i have not i have recorded them from your site to go into my to do roads before i die .Thah brings it up to over 3456 roads to ride before i die looks i will live for ever


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PostPosted: April 14th, 2017, 5:35 am 
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Joined: July 8th, 2011, 7:02 am
Posts: 1007
Location: Mackay, Queensland, Australia
bikersmurff wrote:
thoroughly enjoyed your adventure been on some of those roads and the ones i have not i have recorded them from your site to go into my to do roads before i die .Thah brings it up to over 3456 roads to ride before i die looks i will live for ever

You've got plenty of riding to look forward to then mate. I'll try to get in contact earlier next time I'm down your way, especially if I'm bringing a bike.

_________________
Born to be MILD
2003 Honda XL650V Transalp; 1977 Kawasaki Z750B twin;
2006 Hyosung GT250R; 2001 Yamaha FZS1000.


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PostPosted: April 14th, 2017, 5:39 am 
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Joined: July 8th, 2011, 7:02 am
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Location: Mackay, Queensland, Australia
queasy rider wrote:
Great report Jackflash, what an adventure.....thoroughly enjoyed reading it and envied every mile you described!

That is the way I feel when I read other people's ride reports. I'm glad you enjoyed it mate, I had fun on the trip, but it took me 4 weeks after arriving home to finish the write up, which wasn't so much fun. Reading back over it jolts the grey matter and brings back bits I'd forgotten and a smile to my face.

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PostPosted: April 14th, 2017, 6:52 am 
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Location: California USA
That was quite amazing. I've never been on a trip that long, but even my shorter trips I can't remember that much detail. Of course I think you making up some of the names of those roads and towns. Thanks for doing that. I going to sit down with Google Maps and see if I can figure out your route.

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PostPosted: April 15th, 2017, 2:41 am 
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Joined: July 8th, 2011, 7:02 am
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Location: Mackay, Queensland, Australia
Skyliner wrote:
That was quite amazing. I've never been on a trip that long, but even my shorter trips I can't remember that much detail. Of course I think you making up some of the names of those roads and towns. Thanks for doing that. I going to sit down with Google Maps and see if I can figure out your route.

Thanks Skyliner, have fun searching it. I used Google Maps to remember the names of some of the roads and towns and during the trip I wrote up the route on farcebook every 2 or 3 days, in some cases daily, to keep friends and family informed of where I was and that I was safe and sound. You'll notice that a lot of the towns named sit one side or the other of Australia's Great Dividing Range. Riding back and forth over the twisty mountain roads is my favourite part of these trips.
BTW, I've read some of the town and city names in the USA and California and I bet if you planned a trip like this one you'd find plenty of unusual town and road names within a 1500mi radius of your house. Plan one and go, just remember that you'll usually only cover 1/2 to 2/3 of the distance you had hoped in any given time. I can ride the nearly 1000km to my parents home in Brisbane in one day but prefer to limit myself to 650km a day. Even this distance can be a big ask and I have arrived after dark at many destinations just to keep to the plan, but with livestock and wildlife this can be dangerous.
Australia has a land mass a bit smaller than "the lower 48" with a population of about 24,000,000, and most of us live near the eastern coastline (most in the capital cities of the 3 east coast states) so travelling long distances here by road, while less popular these days is still fairly common. I'm nearly 55 and have made 10 bike trips like this since 2000 and one to Western Australia (over 4,000km each way) back in 1985. In between the '85 and 2000 trips, I kept my trips within my home state of Qld while we raised 4 kids. Try it and if you want details try what I've done on one or two earlier trips and keep a diary.You'll soon know if it's for you.

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2003 Honda XL650V Transalp; 1977 Kawasaki Z750B twin;
2006 Hyosung GT250R; 2001 Yamaha FZS1000.


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PostPosted: April 15th, 2017, 6:52 am 
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Location: Skaneateles, NY
Great writeup for a magnificent trip. Always jealous to read about epic tours such as this but with the snow gone I have a garage queen TA to ride again (damn kids kept the other two over the winter to ride in slightly warmer locales).

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PostPosted: April 16th, 2017, 6:39 am 
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Location: Mackay, Queensland, Australia
sillygoose wrote:
Great writeup for a magnificent trip. Always jealous to read about epic tours such as this but with the snow gone I have a garage queen TA to ride again (damn kids kept the other two over the winter to ride in slightly warmer locales).

Get out there and ride mate! Go somewhere! I'm lucky enough to have worked for fhe same organization for many years and am able to get more time off, so I use some for bike trips.

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2006 Hyosung GT250R; 2001 Yamaha FZS1000.


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