www.TransAlp.org

This Site is Not Affiliated with Honda Corporation
It is currently January 17th, 2018, 11:46 am


All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Front sprocket fastening
PostPosted: December 7th, 2017, 11:56 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: September 29th, 2017, 12:48 am
Posts: 2
Location: Norway
I have just bought me a TA and have read alot on this pages and found many good tips and tricks.
One of the things I found here, is a way of better securing the front sprocket to the shaft.
www.timetoride.de has this picture on their website of a way to secure the sprocket
Attachment:
File comment: from www.timetoride.de
klemmring-für-ritzel-antriebswelle-honda-transalp-umbau-modification.jpg
klemmring-für-ritzel-antriebswelle-honda-transalp-umbau-modification.jpg [ 119.08 KiB | Viewed 210 times ]


My idee was to copy this device, but I found that it was a bit to wide, giving me very little clarence to the cover.
So I made my own twist on the design
Attachment:
File comment: parts
klemring.jpg
klemring.jpg [ 309.42 KiB | Viewed 210 times ]

The device consists of a brass (not gona harm the shaft) collar that fits the groove and outer part of the shaft and has a conical outside. The ring is conical on the inside and has two countersunk holes for the bolts that attaches it to the sprocket.
Attachment:
File comment: Installed
installert.jpg
installert.jpg [ 362.59 KiB | Viewed 210 times ]

On this photo I have not shortende the head of the bolts, but in the end it is flush with the ring.

I hope this may give some others an idee on to how they may modify their TA. Reading this forum sure gave me a lot of idees.

Oyvind


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 8th, 2017, 8:30 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: July 14th, 2014, 4:55 pm
Posts: 418
Location: California USA
I'm not really sure I see what you have accomplished here. It looks to me that your device keeps the sprocket from sliding from side to side, which is the purpose of the holding plate. If there were still any torsional movement it would wear through that brass very fast.

_________________
Ride Now, Work Later!

89 Transalp XL600V X3, 01 Goldwing GL1800, 99 Varadero XL1000V
05 CRF450X Plated, 01 XR650L, 84 Passport C70


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 8th, 2017, 5:15 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: February 4th, 2006, 6:26 pm
Posts: 1359
Location: Champaign, IL USA
I would guess that this would help those whose splines have "left the building" and one would not have to tear the engine down to replace the shaft. Better than welding the sprocket to the shaft!

_________________
Garry Bird, YMRacing, Owner/Mgr.
AHRMA, CCS #72
'89 TA, 06 Ducati Sport 1000 Bella Boomer the race bike, '76 XS650 Farrah the race bike, '76 RD400 Evil Spawn the race bike, '97 Buell T-Bolt S2, ('97 Dyna-Conv RIP 8 June 2017, the bike my son was riding), '06 KLR 650 off road hooligan, and a '79 GS1000E (sold 25 March 2017 after 30 years of ownership), but ride the TA the most miles!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 16th, 2017, 3:58 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: July 8th, 2011, 7:02 am
Posts: 1085
Location: Mackay, Queensland, Australia
As I have said before, keep your chain sufficiently slack that it doesn't bind up on full rear spring compression, and this won't be an issue. Of course Transalps are all old enough now that many are buying the mistakes of previous owners / mechanics who don't allow for the long travel suspension when setting the chain tension.

_________________
Born to be MILD
2003 Honda XL650V Transalp; 1977 Kawasaki Z750B twin;
2006 Hyosung GT250R; 2001 Yamaha FZS1000.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 10th, 2018, 3:59 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: September 29th, 2017, 12:48 am
Posts: 2
Location: Norway
When I bought the bike, I found that the fastening plate on the front sproket was totaly worn through, leaving the sprocket to move freely on the shaft.
The original fastening leaves a lot of room for movement between the shaft and the sprocket. This movement leaves wear on the shaft, the sprocket and not at least, the fastening plate, witch is only a thin steel disc.
The new fastening was made to minimise this movement. Will it stop all movement? Not likely. The slack between shaft and sprocket is too great, so accelerating and breaking with the engine will make it twist on the shaft and thats the reason for brass wedges, so the shaft don't get damaged.
Time will tell if it works or not :roll:

-Oyvind


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 17th, 2018, 6:58 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: July 8th, 2011, 7:02 am
Posts: 1085
Location: Mackay, Queensland, Australia
I hope it works for you. I've had mine since new, and have now covered over 165,000km on it. Due to having owned a KLR650 previously I was already familiar with mechanics not leaving enough slack in chains on bikes with long travel suspension.

_________________
Born to be MILD
2003 Honda XL650V Transalp; 1977 Kawasaki Z750B twin;
2006 Hyosung GT250R; 2001 Yamaha FZS1000.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  


Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group